Effective Solutions Through Partnership

Category Archives: Organizational Change Management (OCM)

7 Tips for Leading Successfully through Change

ADKAR, Communications, Corporate Training, Digital Transformation, Information Technology, Innovation, Innovation in the Public Sector, IT Modernization, Learning, Managing/Leadership, Organization Development (OD), Organizational Change Management (OCM), Process Improvement, Project Management, Prosci, Technology, Training, User Adoption

By Elizabeth Long, Prosci, CSM

Most people don’t resist change just to resist change. Most people resist change because of fear.

Fear of:

  • No longer being the knowledge holder or subject matter expert (SME)
  • Not being capable of performing the new work
  • Not being comfortable with or slow to learn the new job/technology
  • Having to do things differently—maybe they have been performing the same function the same way for a long period of time and they want to keep the status quo
  • Losing their job—in some cases, people choose to leave on their own; the truth is, sometimes jobs may need to be altered to keep up with changing technology

If your organization is going through a period of change—whether an update in technology or a corporate reorganization—it’s important to know how to address the fears and help users transition smoothly.

Here are a few actions you can take to make this happen:

  1. Get users involved by leveraging them to help document as-is business processes and create to-be business processes.
  2. Provide opportunities for people to have hands-on practice with the new system.
  3. If testing a new software system, consider which users are appropriate to participate in User Acceptance Testing
  4. Address concerns about job loss—are they really losing their job or are they just going to perform a new job function?
  5. Empower SMEs to provide input on communications to the larger group.
  6. Leverage SMEs to help develop and review training material and assist with/support training.
  7. Provide honest and direct communication regarding job impacts and information about the project.

If you need help in managing a large change in your organization, we can help! Our change management experts can help you determine who your users and SMEs are, conduct a stakeholder analysis, determine the best approach for engagement, and more!

About the Author: Elizabeth Long is a professional Organization Development Consultant and Curriculum Developer/Trainer. She received her Certification in Organizational Change Management from Prosci and is certified in e-learning development from Langevine Learning Center. Elizabeth has worked in many industries: High tech, healthcare, and state and local government. Currently, Elizabeth works as an Executive Consultant with KAI Partners, Inc. as a contractor working in a variety of California State Departments. Elizabeth has lived in Sacramento for the past 20 years and appreciates the history of Sacramento as well as its convenience to many well-known destinations like San Francisco, Tahoe, and Reno.

Software Development: The Ever-Changing World of Waterfalls, Sticky Notes, and Sharpies

Agile, Design Thinking, Digital Transformation, Information Technology, Innovation, Innovation in the Public Sector, IT Modernization, Learning, Organizational Change Management (OCM), Project Management, Project Management Professional (PMP), Public Sector, Scrum, Software Development, Technology, Waterfall

By Sid Richardson, PMP

Raise your hand if you’ve run a software project using the Agile Methodology and have run a software project using the more traditional waterfall project management methodology? I’m sure there are many of you!

Having worked in project management for nearly 30 years, I have run software projects using a variety of different methodologies and I can certainly appreciate the benefits that they all bring to the table.

One true constant in life—and in software development—is change, and I’ve seen my fair share. Here’s what I’ve learned along the way.

The ‘80s were RAD

In the mid-1980s, a software development methodology called Rapid Application Development (RAD) began to take off.

James Martin developed the RAD approach at IBM and formalized it in 1991 by publishing a book called Rapid Application Development. The RAD approach was based on working closely with the customer and prototyping solutions quickly to deliver a final product. The intention was that there would be less effort placed on the planning aspects and more on the customer collaboration aspects.

While RAD was not necessarily a true project methodology for software development, I believe it led to an easier buy-in to the Agile project methodology many of us use now.

Meeting the Requirements

When I was working in Europe in the early-to-mid 1990s, there was a heavy emphasis on formal approaches to project management and software projects. This may sound strange—or it may provide flash-backs for some of you!—but I remember a time when absolutely no analysis or design work was allowed to begin until the user requirements (typically volumes of paper in large bound files) were received in hardcopy form with sign-off by senior company executives.

Can you imagine working in that type of environment?

The traditional waterfall approach to software development projects was rather rigid, but I can understand the reasoning—the leadership wanted to have a high level of confidence in what would be delivered.

Fragile Agile

Fast forward to almost 20 years ago and many organizations encountered internal pushback and some challenges with the adoption of Agile as a software development methodology. The common joke thrown around in the middle of an Agile rollout was that it was “Fragile.”

Since the requirements in an Agile methodology are more dynamic, things eventually settled down and as someone said to me recently, “I guess we’ve come into an age of sticky notes and Sharpies.”

Design on My Mind

At KAI Partners, we have recently started using Design Thinking. Design Thinking provides a creative, solution-based approach to solving problems and is also sometimes known as human-centered design or user-centered design. It’s on the side of creative problem solving, which—being a creative type of guy—is why I gravitate toward it.

Design Thinking encourages organizations to focus on the people or the customer—and it’s the people-centered focus that leads to better products, services, and processes.

While it’s not a software development methodology, Design Thinking can be used as a problem-solving tool to accompany almost any software development methodology you choose to use.

Is there a Perfect Approach?

So, with all these different methodologies, is one better than another? Well, it depends on the project at hand!

One of the common drawbacks to the RAD approach of the 1980s was the lack of scalability. RAD typically focused on small to medium-sized projects and teams. Then Agile came along in the early 2000s and, as a lean philosophy, could certainly be applied at an enterprise level.

What I think works best is a blended methodology that combines the best features of a variety of different approaches.

If the last 30 years in project management and software development have taught me anything, it’s that there are components and approaches of many different methodologies that—when combined—can make a robust and flexible way to deliver high-quality, timely products to the customer.

And, considering that a new methodology will likely make its way to the surface soon, we can’t get too comfortable. Luckily, as project managers and agents of change, we are used to the continual cycle of change and it will be up to us learn the new methodology, prepare our teams, and adapt our work accordingly.

Need support on your next project? KAI Partners can help your organization implement the software development methodology that works best for you and your needs!

About the Author: Mr. Richardson’s passion is Data Warehousing, Business Intelligence, Master Data Management and Data Architectures. He has helped Fortune 500 companies in the US, Europe, Canada, and Australia lead large-scale corporate system and data initiatives and teams to success. His experience spans 30 years in the Information Technology space, specifically with experience in data warehousing, business intelligence, information management, data migrations, converged infrastructures and recently Big Data. Mr. Richardson’s industry experience includes: Finance and Banking, government, utilities, insurance, retail, manufacturing, telecommunications, healthcare, large-scale engineering and transportation sectors.

OCM Success Story [VIDEO]

ADKAR, Corporate Training, Digital Transformation, Government, Innovation, Innovation in the Public Sector, IT Modernization, KAI Partners, Learning, Organizational Change Management (OCM), Project Management, Prosci, Public Sector, Sacramento, Technology, Train the Trainer, Training

One of our OCM consultants shares one of her most successful change management tactics! We empower your organization to carry on the change after our work is done! Learn more here!

3 Ways Organizations can Achieve their Goals

ADKAR, Community Service, Employee Engagement, Event Recap, Organizational Change Management (OCM), Prosci, Sacramento, Team Building

By Debbie Blagsvedt, CSM, LSSGB

A few weeks ago, I attended a networking event for Junior Achievement of Sacramento sponsored by the Sacramento Business Journal.

Dream Big & Reach Your Potential

Junior Achievement of Sacramento offers volunteer-delivered, kindergarten-12th grade programs to foster work-readiness, entrepreneurship, and financial literacy skills. Junior Achievement uses experiential learning to inspire students in our community to dream big and reach their potential.

Walking Down Memory Lane

Walking through the doors, memories of my involvement with Junior Achievement in high school came flooding back. Listening to business leaders at the ripe old age of 16, I recall feeling a sense of excitement and curiosity about what it would mean to “reach my potential.”

The concepts introduced over 40 years ago still resonate with me today in my role as an OCM consultant as I work with organizations and encourage them to, “dream big and reach their potential.”

Major organizational change is about transformation—it’s a process of profound and radical change that takes an organization in a new direction and drives them to reach their potential.

So, what can organizations do to bring the lofty idea of dreams and potential into reality? Consider adopting these concepts when embarking on your next change initiative:

Change Initiative Tips

1. Collaborate on the vision. A vision is an essential part of any change initiative—and something that’s recommended by all the change management methodologies.

Without a vision, organizational change efforts can lead people in circles or question the organization’s sanity.

A well-developed vision helps boost urgency and maintains focus on the future.

Effective visions start with senior leadership imagining the future—but it doesn’t stop there.

Creating a vision requires collaboration with key stakeholders at all levels to ensure buy-in and shared ownership.

2. Embrace change as an opportunity: While working on a reorganization project, I asked workgroup members what excited them about the project. One member responded “opportunity,” which was followed by several heads nodding in agreement.

Change provides the opportunity to think differently, repair what’s not working, and build on elements that contribute to an organization’s success.

To go back to Junior Achievement principles, part of change being an opportunity is the commitment to “dream big.” Allow project teams to realize this opportunity through their engagement and involvement.

3. Believe that challenges can be overcome: Have a little faith, my friends! If we can land a man on the moon or develop a hand-held device that provides answers to the most obscure questions in seconds, then organizations can overcome formidable challenges.

Leaders must put their trust in staff to lead the charge.

In order to develop solutions to challenges, an effective approach is to have those closest to the challenge together work together with people who are not.

Engaging the right people at the right time with the right skills and attitude can bring an end to what was once a daunting barrier.

Final Thoughts

It was an honor to be back at my former Junior Achievement stomping grounds—and to be reminded that no matter our age, job, or current project, we can always use support to help us achieve our big dreams.

Does your organization need change management support? Contact us at info@kaipartners.com to learn more about how we can help your organization meet its goals!

About the Author: Debbie Blagsvedt is an Organizational Change Consultant with over 25 years’ experience in change management, performance management, process improvement, training, and facilitation. She has a worked in both the private, public, and non-profit sectors in industries that include health, legal, financial, social services, high tech, and transportation. She currently works as an Organizational Change Consultant with KAI Partners on assignment with a public sector agency. Debbie is passionate about collaboration among teams which she believes leads to high employee satisfaction and is equally fascinated with the rapid-fire speed of change and what it means for organizations today. Debbie grew up in the bay area but now considers Sacramento her home. She has many interests from home projects to wine tasting, volunteering, witnessing the changing face of Sacramento, and going on new adventures with her family and friends…Not to mention nightly walks and occasional mountain hikes with her dog, Emmett.

Medicaid Enterprise Systems Conference 2019

Conferences, Digital Transformation, Event Recap, Government, Healthcare, Information Technology, Innovation, Innovation in the Public Sector, IT Modernization, KAI Partners, Medicaid Enterprise Systems Conference 2019, Organizational Change Management (OCM), Project Management, Public Sector, Technology

KAI Partners was thrilled to attend the Medicaid Enterprise Systems Conference (MESC) last week in Chicago. MESC is an annual event bringing together public sector and private sector Medicaid leaders and partners to discuss issues around national Medicaid programs and systems.

A primary focus at MESC is claims management by Medicaid Management Information Systems (MMIS), provider management, and benefits eligibility management.

MESC is a critical meeting point for thoughtful dialogue, workshops, and demonstrations of new technologies. Over the course of three days, the KAI Partners team participated in several informational sessions, attended workshops, and had discussions on the trade show floor with new contacts and potential partners.

The conference provided insight into the various issues confronting systems across the nation and a valuable opportunity for us to share our knowledge working with MMIS technology, data warehousing, analytics, and business intelligence.

The themes of this year’s event centered primarily around the following:

  1. Health Care Innovation
  2. Medicaid Innovation
  3. Operations and Compliance
  4. Procurement and Contracting
  5. Interoperability
  6. Data and Analytics

These themes appeared throughout MESC sessions, where topics included the role of AI, Robotic Process Automation, Program Integrity, Modularity, Data Analytics, Organizational Change Management, Modernization, Outcomes-based approach to successful Medicaid system programs, and more.

From discussions at MESC, as well as our work here in California, we know the goals are to develop Medicaid solutions that are qualitative, supported by relevant technology, and that meet the needs of those who rely on these critical medical services.

One discussion centered around outcomes and encouraged technology vendors to be more active in pushing their technology further to achieve the desired outcomes—and to not be content with checking boxes on contract requirements.

Technology vendors were encouraged to engage in greater depth in understanding the limitations of the proposed system and to work with their public sector partners to achieve results that will have a meaningful impact on the populations served.

We were very encouraged by the session themes and with our discussions during the conference—they play to our company strengths and support our goal to serve a greater segment of the Medicaid enterprise. We look forward to pursuing opportunities that provide excellence in health care consulting and helping Medicaid departments achieve the programs and member outcomes for which they strive!

Attending MESC on behalf of KAI Partners this year were:

Ryan Hatcher: Ryan Hatcher is a skilled communications and management consultant with over a decade of experience campaigning for government, public affairs, and political clients. Ryan serves as an executive consultant providing communications support to one of California’s heath care agencies. He resides in Sacramento with his wife, Nikki, and their two dogs; in his spare time, Ryan enjoys experimenting in the kitchen and tinkering/building things in his garage.

Alexis Kalman: A graduate from UC Davis, Alexis spent over 10 years working with State Medicaid and other health and human service departments to develop, implement, and operate analytic warehouses and decision support systems. In her current role with KAI Partners, Alexis works as a technical project manager for a statewide education agency. Alexis is a board member at the YMCA of Superior California representing the Yolo YMCA. She also participates in both Boy and Girl Scouts with both of her children.

Lucie-Anne Radimsky: Lucie-Anne has over 15 years’ experience in communications and business development in the U.S. and Europe. She has represented clients within the technology, energy, and telecommunications sectors to government agencies, press, and industry analysts throughout the world. Lucie-Anne is an active community volunteer and has served on numerous non-profit boards and led alumni groups in Paris, Washington D.C., and San Francisco. She holds a B.A. in Economics from the University of California, Irvine. She resides in Sacramento with her Brazilian husband and two boys.

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