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Sacramento ARMA Records Knowledge Conference Event Recap

Conferences, Cyber Security, Data Management, Government, Information Security, Information Technology, Innovation in the Public Sector, IT Modernization, IT Security, KAI Partners, Public Sector, Ransomware, Risk Assessment, Sacramento, Technology

By Jamal Hartenstein, JD, CISSP, CGEIT, PMP

The Greater Sacramento Capitol Chapter of ARMA recently held its annual Records Knowledge Conference, which brought together records managers from city, county, and state clerk offices.

According to our local ARMA chapter, ARMA is dedicated to providing education and resources to those in the Records Management and Information Governance fields. They are committed to enhancing Records Management and Information Governance professionals through training, networking, leadership, and outreach.

The conference attendees brought a sense of eagerness to learn and share—ARMA chapter leadership gave event attendees a special opportunity to hear from world-class speakers—including and a lead researcher on the IBM Watson project, Dr. Ashish Kundu—on some of the most important and cutting-edge topics.

Along with a formidable group CEOs, I was honored to be asked to speak about Cybersecurity Threats to Information Governance. Highlights of the event and major takeaways included:

  • Understanding what data you have, who accesses it, and where it goes is paramount.
  • Conflicts among document retention policies, industry best practices, and laws suggest that we seek out and use the highest common denominator.
  • Trending topics and buzzwords the government sector include players like Smart Communities, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Digital ID, Blockchain, NIST, and the KAI Partners approach to security assessments.
  • Data Migrations are underway. Records Managers who respond to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests for public records or subpoena must deliver records formats adhering to general business practices, which may be legacy.
  • Regarding Third Party Risk Management (TPRM), cloud services, and Business Associate Agreements, liability points back to the data controller regardless of contracts with data processors or third parties.
  • Mobile device management and data/device ownership remain a point of contention and confusion during public record requests.
  • Innovation is forcing a cultural shift in workforce demands and understandings of emerging technologies.
  • Artificial Intelligence (AI) solutions can be used to categorize and classify data, performing some of the tasks of current Data Custodians and Data Owners.
  • While AI may not replace Records Managers, Records Managers who understand and embrace AI will inevitably replace those who do not.

Public sector IT innovation and modernization means systems and processes change rapidly. One example of this is California Assembly Bill 2658, recently signed into law by the governor. This new law updates the definition of an Electronic Record to include blockchain and smart contracts as legally recognized records. It sends a clear signal that digital records management, particularly blockchain technology and smart contracts, are priorities for a more innovative and dynamic public sector.

This new law impacts public records requests because entries logged in public agency-owned private blockchains are electronic records. These records are susceptible to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). Records Managers may benefit from technology that makes the identification and delivery of public records to requestors easier. It may also create convenience for those exercising Public Records Act (PRA) requests. It’s a double-edged sword; it streamlines the processes but increases PRA volume at the same time.

The discussion of the California blockchain law was one most important topics discussed at the ARMA event. Another popular topic was IT Security Assessments.

The urgency in public sector data governance and records management is an incredible opportunity to embed IT security controls for the public sector personnel working at the heart of the ever-expanding challenges.

KAI Partners performs security assessments to address the multitude of challenges facing the public sector. Our assessments help ensure secure and efficient delivery systems where the organizational objectives align with the development of strategic plans and programs. In addition, KAI Partners’ training division—KAIP Academy—works to address technical skills gaps. Our training courses include ITIL, Project Management, Agile/Scrum, and more.

Were you at the ARMA Conference? What were your biggest takeaways about public sector innovation?

About the Author: IT Security Program Manager at KAI Partners, Jamal Hartenstein is a cybersecurity legal expert who has helped some of the country’s largest financial institutions, healthcare companies, and federal agencies develop their IT Security Roadmap programs. In his current role, Jamal provides guidance to executive staff and security professionals on laws, frameworks, and policies that help shape their strategic plan, and helps organizations innovate safely and securely. Prior to working for KAI Partners, Jamal served as an Electronic Warfare Sergeant in the U.S. Army Military Intelligence Corps, where he was a steward for Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) framework. He earned his undergraduate degree from Georgia Military College and his Juris Doctorate from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in California.

About the KAIP Academy’s Training and Certification classes

Agile, Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO), Certified ScrumMaster (CSM), Corporate Training, Information Technology, KAIP Academy, Learning, Professional Development, Project Management, Project Management Professional (PMP), Sacramento, Scrum, Technology, Training, Workforce Development

Learn more about the KAIP Academy, northern California’s premiere training and certification resource for professionals looking to advance their career and professional opportunities!

Interested in registering for one of KAIP Academy’s upcoming courses? Start here!

Big Data and Hadoop: A high-level overview for the layperson

Big Data, Data Management, Information Technology, Internet of Things, Sacramento, Technology

By Sid Richardson, PMP, CSM

I have been in the data warehousing practice since 1994, when I implemented a successful Distributed Data Warehouse for a flagship banking product, followed by co-developing Oracle’s Data Warehouse Methodology. In August 1997, I was invited to speak at the Data Warehouse Institute Conference in Boston.

Over the years, I’ve researched and implemented what I would consider some small scale/junior Big Data systems. I have an interest in Big Data and wanted to share my learnings on Big Data and Hadoop as a high-level overview for the layperson / busy executive.

What is Big Data?

Big Data defines an IT approach used to process the enormous amounts of available information from social media, emails, log files, text, camera/video, sensors, website clickstreams, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags, audio, and other sources of information in combination with existing computer files and database data.

In the 1990s, three major trends occurred to make up Big Data: “Big” Transaction Data, “Big” Interaction Data, and “Big” Data Processing.

In 2001, Big Data was defined by Doug Laney, former Vice President and Distinguished Analyst with the Gartner Chief Data Officer (CDO) research and advisory team. Mr. Laney defined Big Data by the “three Vs”:

    1. Velocity – Speed of incoming data feeds.
    2. Variety – Unstructured data, social media, documents, images.
    3. Volume – Large quantities of data.

IBM decided to add two more Vs:

    1. Veracity – Accuracy of the data.
    2. Value – To define Big Data.

Why do we need Big Data?

In a nutshell: We need Big Data because there is a lot of data to process, for example:

Also noted by The Economist, the abundance of data and tools to capture, process, and share all this information already exceeds the available storage space (and the number of eyes on the planet to review and analyze it all!)

According to Forbes’s 2018 article, “How Much Data Do We Create Every Day? The Mind-Blowing Stats Everyone Should Read,” there are 2.5 quintillion bytes of data created each day. And, over the last two years alone, 90 percent of the data in the world was generated.

Clearly, the creation of data is expanding at an astonishing pace—from the amount of data being produced to the way in which it’s re-structured for analysis and used. This trend presents enormous challenges, but it also presents incredible opportunities.

You’re probably thinking, alright, I get the big data thing, but why couldn’t data warehouses perform this role? Well, data warehouses are large, complex, and expensive projects that typically run approximately 12-18 month-long durations with high failure rates (The failure rate of data warehouses across all industries is high—Gartner once estimated that as many as 50 percent of data warehouse projects would have only limited acceptance or fail entirely).

A new approach to handle Big Data was born: Hadoop.

What is Hadoop?

In a nutshell, Hadoop is a Java-based framework governed by the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) that initially addressed the ‘Volume’ and ‘Variety’ aspects of Big Data and provided a distributed, fault-tolerant, batched data processing environment (one record at a time, but designed to scale to Petabyte-sized file processing).

Hadoop was created out of a need to substantially reduce the cost of storage for massive volumes of data for analysis and does so by emulating a distributed parallel processing environment by networking many cheap, existing commodity processors and storage together, rather than using dedicated hardware and storage solutions.

Why Hadoop?

The Challenges with Hadoop

There is a limited understanding about Hadoop across the IT industry. Hadoop has operational limitations and performance challenges—you need to resort to several extended components to make it work and to make it reliable. And, Hadoop is becoming more fragmented, pulled by different commercial players trying to leverage their own solutions.

In summary…

The Hadoop Framework addresses a number of previous challenges facing the processing of Big Data for analysis. The explosion in deployment of data capture devices across all industries world-wide necessitated a more cost-effective way to store and access the massive volumes of data accumulating by the second!

I hope this blog post has provided you with a better understanding of some key Big Data and Hadoop concepts and technologies. Have you worked with Big Data and/or Hadoop? Let us know your thoughts and experiences in the comments!

P.S. If you have gotten this far and are curious where the name Hadoop comes from, here you go! The name ‘Hadoop’ was coined by one of the sons of Doug Cutting, a software designer and advocate and creator of open-source search technology. Mr. Cutting’s son gave the name ‘Hadoop’ to his toy elephant and Mr. Cutting used the name for his open source project because it was easy to pronounce.

About the Author: Mr. Richardson’s passion is Data Warehousing, Business Intelligence, Master Data Management and Data Architectures. He has helped Fortune 500 companies in the US, Europe, Canada, and Australia lead large-scale corporate system and data initiatives and teams to success. His experience spans 30 years in the Information Technology space, specifically with experience in data warehousing, business intelligence, information management, data migrations, converged infrastructures and recently Big Data. Mr. Richardson’s industry experience includes: Finance and Banking, government, utilities, insurance, retail, manufacturing, telecommunications, healthcare, large-scale engineering and transportation sectors.

ITIL 4 Exam Prep FAQs [INFOGRAPHIC]

Corporate Training, Infographic, Information Technology, Innovation in the Public Sector, IT Modernization, ITIL, KAIP Academy, Learning, Sacramento, Technology, Training

You know we offer ITIL exam prep courses through KAIP Academy, but if you’re on the fence about whether this class is right for you, check out this FAQ! Do you have a question we didn’t answer? Ask it in the comments or email academy@kaipartners.com! Then click here to register for a KAIP Academy course!

Why Teamwork is Necessary for Innovation in the Public Sector

Information Technology, Innovation, Innovation in the Public Sector, IT Modernization, Project Management, Public Sector, Sacramento, Team Building, Technology

By Todd Wallace, PMP

Thomas Edison did not invent the lightbulb. Henry Ford did not invent the assembly line. Elon Musk did not invent electric cars. While these men all had a hand in growing the success of these products, none of them was the actual inventor, and none of them did it all on their own.

Much like any accomplishment in the public or private industry, it is easier to associate a major innovation with a single person—this is called the Great Man Fallacy.

However, it is a larger group with input from many sources that moves a concept forward—if two minds are better than one, then a team of minds is best.

Thomas Edison had a team of inventors working at his “invention factory” in New Jersey. Edison was the boss, but the team members helped with the various inventions that came out of their shop. It’s said that Edison tested 6,000 materials before he found the right combination for his version of the lightbulb and it is highly unlikely that he tested all 6,000 materials himself while his team stood by and watched.

Elon Musk is the face of electric cars with Tesla. His name is associated with the revolution of alternative fueled vehicles. However, before Elon Musk was even involved, Tesla was utilizing game-changing lithium ion batteries instead of the bulkier lead acid batteries used by other electric vehicles of the time. Before even this, other car manufacturers had already tried their hand at electric cars—in fact, in 1884, Thomas Parker produced the first electric car in London. Elon Musk may be the face of the modern movement and people may associate him with the invention of the electric car, but in reality, it was a long line of tweaks and updates by many teams consisting of many great minds—before Musk even entered the game.

These examples may be from the private sector, but the same concept applies to the public sector. While the head of a state agency might be the only person named in the news headline, a successful project implementation is due to the hard work of a large team.

The primary difference between innovation in the private sector and innovation in the public sector is the importance of teamwork.

In the private sector, it is possible for one person to invent something in their garage and bring it to market entirely on their own. In the public sector, nothing is done entirely by one individual. Gathering requirements for a project must reach across departments or other agencies to ensure the application will work in the larger ecosystem. Development is a constantly evolving team effort and closely tied to testing, which goes back to the multi-departmental team for review and approval. Implementation needs to be coordinated with everyone to ensure no reverberating effect on other teams and departments. Throughout all of this, there are competing priorities by various key stakeholders that need to be negotiated in order to keep the project moving forward.

In the private sector, negotiations can involve many different variables and creativity in terms of what can be offered. In the public sector, you cannot offer nearly as much in negotiations, so a relationship and understanding of how groups work with each other is key. Having an established relationship is the strongest negotiation piece in the public sector. Teamwork allows for smoother negotiations and effective advancement the project.

Teamwork is what makes a project a success. The ability to work together and build relationships allows a project to move forward. It would be a lot easier for a “Great Man” to implement a project and not have to worry about anybody else—but the results of the “Great Team” will always create something better.

About the Author: Todd Wallace is a Senior Project Manager with KAI Partners, Inc. He started his professional career as a student assistant in the special projects department of a state agency and worked as a state employee for over 7 years before transitioning to private sector and consulting to state agencies. He has a BS from CSU, Sacramento in Small Business Operations and an MBA from UC, Davis in Entrepreneurship and Strategy. In his free time, Todd loves tinkering on cars and motorcycles and has a passion for innovation.

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